Foreign Business Act – Current Status & Risks


There has been no attempt to revise the Foreign Business Act (FBA) since the NLA’s efforts to make the law more restrictive by re-defining the term “alien business” in 2007.  But there has been a marked increase in enforcement.

In August of 2009, a major international law firm announced the first court ruling that a company had been found guilty of operating without a foreign business license in an area restricted under the FBA.  The word “guilty” is used here intentionally, since the FBA has penal provisions providing for up to three years imprisonment, dissolution of a business found to be in violation, disgorgement of shareholding and fines of up to one million Baht.

The Ministry of Commerce (“MOC”) periodically announces that it is surveying business registrations looking for evidence that companies are employing illegal nominee structures.  These surveys concentrate on particular business areas or particular provinces of Thailand, and change from time to time.

But the biggest risk we have seen comes from competitors and disgruntled business partners and employees.  These people have an interest in creating problems and often have access to inside information that the MOC might not otherwise see.   This is a very serious problem if your business is exposed to FBA risk.

What Businesses are Most at Risk?

When the MOC conducts it surveys, it generally focuses on particular industries or particular regions.  But we don’t see many serious problems from such surveys.  Instead, it’s the tips from competitors and former business partners and employees that create the most serious problems.  That, and internet advertising by certain service providers, causes the most grief for foreigners.

The biggest problems seem to occur with businesses formed before the recent efforts to make the FBA more restrictive (when practices were more lax) and structures formed by certain “full” service providers that push the envelope when promoting their services.  The riskiest structures that cause the most grief are invariably established by service providers which claim they can provide any service a new business needs in Thailand from accounting services, brokerage services, human resources, IT services and legal services to anything else a new business needs – including Thai majority shareholders . 

These full stop shops are the legal equivalent of fire traps. 

Nominee shareholding to circumvent the FBA is illegal.  We’ll discuss illegal nominee shareholding in more detail later, but not much discussion is needed to see that any service provider which advertises that it provides Thai nationals (be they lawyers, accountants or anyone else) to ensure the company is Thai majority owned is waiving a red flag right in the face of the MOC. 

The advertisement itself is evidence of an illegal nominee relationship.  We have seen this over and over again, often involving the same “players”.  The MOC is quite capable of searching the internet to identify these service providers and the companies they establish, and they do so.

When you pause for a moment and think about the FBA’s prohibition on illegal nominee shareholding, none of this should come as a surprise.  A service provider that essentially promotes itself over the internet by saying that it can do anything, including provide the majority Thai shareholders, attracts exactly the type of attention a foreign investor in Thailand does not want.  There are other reasons why such service providers are risky (a lack of checks and balances on their work), and we will get around to that in the near future.

Even though the NLA was not able to make the FBA more restrictive, the FBA is still very much alive.  The MOC is taking a more aggressive stance on illegal nominee shareholding, and the MOC now has learned a great deal over the past few years as it has stepped up enforcement efforts.

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