FCPA Compliance Work Just Got Harder in Thailand


Thai laws are not unique in creating perverse incentives that lead to unintended and unwanted consequences.  On 21 July 2010, President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) into law. The Dodd-Frank Act primarily introduces major changes in the regulation of the financial services industry, but it also permits “whistleblowers” (click on this link for background on this part of the Frank-Dodd Act) in Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and securities fraud cases to claim a 10% to 30% reward in enforcement actions where the penalties recovered exceed U.S.$1 million.  Was this good policy or not?  I can see arguments on both sides of this issue, but I have major reservations and fear this could be a serious mistake.

We have seen how the Thai Customs Department’s bounty system creates perverse incentives in the enforcement of Thai Customs laws.  Is there something here for U.S. regulators to learn from Thailand?

The bounties from several recent high several high profile FCPA cases would have exceeded 100 million dollars.  As James Tillen, George Clarke, and Kevin Mosley from Miller & Chevalier reported in Corporate Compliance Insights:

If a Siemens whistleblower had been eligible for the 30% reward proposed in the current draft of the legislation, he or she could have received a windfall of $496 million.  In the 2009 case against Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) and former parent company Halliburton, the DOJ imposed a $402 million fine and the SEC assessed $177 million in disgorgement, for a total of $579 million in penalties.  The windfall for a whistleblower in that case could have totaled $173 million.

By contrast, consider the relatively “meager” incentives the Thai Customs Department offers tipsters.  Consider the results of that incentive system.  Imagine the possibilities here.

In a recent New York Times article, Sean McKessy, chief of the new S.E.C.’s whistle-blower office, said: “The program “will strengthen our ability to carry our mission and it will save us much time and resources in the process.”  Mr. McKessy is quoted in this same article as saying the small agency: “has already received an uptick in quality tips, including lengthy letters laying our elaborate schemes.”  The agency has a new website here with easy to follow instructions on how to submit tips.

If you don’t want to complete the form or if you are concerned about the repercussions of submitting a tip directly, simple Google “FCPA whistleblower” and I am sure you will have no problems finding one of several U.S. firms that will happily help in submitting a tip.  The rewards are great.  I ran this same search several times here in Thailand and each time I found several such firms on the front page of my Google search results.

The United States Chamber of Commerce is not happy about this (please do not confuse AMCHAM Thailand with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, although I personally sympathize with their concerns on this issue).  According to the New York Times, David Hirschmann, president and chief executive of the Chamber’s Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness says:

In approving this new whistle-blower rule, the S.E.C. has chosen to put trial lawyer profits ahead of effective compliance and corporate governance…This rule will make it harder and slower to detect and stop corporate fraud.

The dig at “trial lawyer profits” is a cheap dig, but he has a point.  It’s early days, but having been involved in several internal FCPA investigations here, having seen how the Thai Customs incentives work in practice and now seeing the early signs of how the whistleblower program is being promoted on the internet, I think its a strong point.  There are other troubling signs.

A whistleblower doesn’t need to report violations internally in order to obtain a reward.  The FCPA Blog comments:

Whistleblowers will run to the SEC whenever there’s a whiff of overseas bribery. They won’t talk about it with their bosses inside the company first. Why should they? That would be like giving away a lottery ticket. And why expose themselves to retaliation? If they go straight to the SEC, they’re immune from corporate discipline. So they’ll go to the feds, taking with them as many internal emails, audit documents, and bank records as they can carry.

I hope I am proven wrong, but my hunch is that this new development will make FCPA compliance work harder, much harder, here in Thailand.  I have seen how things tend to work here and the incredible challenges that foreign companies already face in places such as Thailand.  Stifling the supply side is important, but we really need to see more action curbing the demand side.

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Comments

  • James Beeson  On August 16, 2011 at 9:40 pm

    I think that with the effects of lost income due to the FDA agreements that Thailand is completing, then the revenue of the Customs departments are under threat, and compliance is the alternative income stream for what is lost, therefore I perceive this as “teeth”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: